West Virginia becomes 26th right-to-work state

by examiner.com  |  published on February 13, 2016

Unions, reeling from recent defeats in right-to-work states and declining memberships, suffered yet another major defeat when the West Virginia legislature overrode a veto from Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin (D). Tomlin was not able to reach across the aisle for support, ensuring his veto was dismissed by a simple majority, voting 18-16 in the Senate and 55-43 in the House along party lines, according to HuffPost Politics article published Friday. Typically, in American politics, Democratic Party candidates and officeholders benefit from the pocketbooks of unions that financially support their campaigns while taking swipes at Republican opponents.

The override came swiftly and historically, as it means that a majority of states in the country are now protect their workers by law from being forced by unions to pay dues and fees. West Virginia is the 26th state, including Michigan, to pass right-to-work legislation. The law goes into effect in May.

Experts say the West Virginia punch to union’s midsection may not be the last powerful blow dealt this year. In California, teachers are suing to reject union “fair share service fees” that all public employees in that state are required to pay. Sometimes referred to as an “agency fee,” the charge against non-union public employees is roughly the same amount as members’ dues and fees. Pundits analyzing lines of questioning by Supreme Court justices say the court is likely to rule against unions’ “fair share service fees.” Beyond West Virginia, should the California case go against unions, it could start a domino effect in 20 states that have similar laws on the books.

In West Virginia, all of the state’s Democratic Party representatives voted against the right-to-work bill including the governor. However, since 2010, Republicans have made great electoral gains in state legislatures. The National Right to Work Committee claims forcing nonunion workers to pay union fees amounts to levying a tax, something unions do not have the right to do. The committee is basking in the victory in a state that many union workers were hurt by Pres. Obama’s recent Executive Order imposing stiff regulations and penalties on coal mining and other energy-producing entities.The United States Supreme Court shot down Mr. Obama’s executive order against miners earlier this week

“While this is a good day, it is not the end of the work to be done,” the group said in a statement. “We hope West Virginia’s embrace of workplace freedom will help spur other states to join the Right to Work ranks.”

  • I Seigel

    Here is one line of this news story that stands out: “The United States Supreme Court shot down Mr. Obama’s executive order against miners earlier this week.”

    What a bunch of horse s**t! The EO wasn’t directed against miners at all. It was promoting clean energy and helping to combat climate change. The EO was not “against miners”. Typical right-wing, anti-labor bull.

  • I Seigel

    Perfect! Now the coal companies and all the other businesses in West Virginia can hire illegals or others willing to work for the lowest wages, no health benefits, not retirement or pension plans and dangerous working conditions.

    And you claim that Obama and the libturds are attacking the middle class??!!?? LOL!

    West Virginians, welcome to the Race To The Bottom!! You’re about to get even poorer than you already are.

  • Larry J. Overfield

    Unionism is just another one of those ism’s that have crept into our society under the guise of being American. It is not, it is a an attack on the Constitution, a strike against the law of the land; no pun intended. The very fabric of unions is socialism, another ism.

    • I Seigel

      An “attack on the Constitution”? How so? “A strike against the law of the land”? You mean laws that were designed to help guarantee a safe workplace, like OSHA, or laws regulating a 40-hour work week, pay for overtime, for family leave? Should WalMart be told they don’t have to pay overtime? Will it be OK to start hiring 12-year-olds? Will it be OK now for coal companies to not be responsible for the safe operation of coal mines? What laws such as these have been bad for workers, or an “attack” on the Constitution?

      • Larry J. Overfield

        These so called laws that you are talking about came from unelected persons. They either came from departments that are under the executive branch run by a person that is appointed by the president. They issue regulations that are enforced as law by the same branch that runs them, that my friend is unconstitutional. Or they come from a union that threatens the company with a strike, that is coercion and terrorism.

        You have missed my point entirely, My point is that unions are not an American idea, they are from socialistic and communistic ideals. It is always the idea that safety is above freedom, one will always give way to the other.

        “Those who surrender freedom for security will not have, nor do they deserve, either one.”

        Benjamin Franklin

  • Shaymamma8

    Wow, another state promoting the “right to be broke”! When will people learn,the only ones who benefit from this is the employers who can now legally underpay people who were stupid enough to vote for someone who promotes this fiasco. Good bye benefits, hello minimum wage. So glad I worked during a time when we had strong unions. We had great benefits, competitive pay, vacations, etc., you know, all that good stuff folks just gave away. Well, good luck with that!!!

    • drrocko

      Bulldump ! Ask the employees at Pontiac, Mercury, Plymouth and Oldsmobile how the union bs worked out. Guess what ? Those companies don’t exist any more due to union GREED ! Caterpillar and GM and Chrysler now build more vehicles in Mexico then the do in the US – due to inflated union wages and inflated taxes.

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