A bad report card for nation and Connecticut

by Linda Conner Lambeck  |  published on October 29, 2015

The “Nation’s Report Card” is out, and its generally not good news for the nation or Connecticut.

Math scores across the nation were down for both fourth- and eighth-graders who took the National Assessment of Educational Progress test in 2015 compared to 2013. Meanwhile in reading, eighth-grade scores were down and fourth-grade scores were flat.

The NAEP is given to a representative sample of students across the country. In Connecticut, that amounted to about 9,300 students.

Nationwide, in fourth-grade reading, 36 percent of students scored at or above proficient (no significant change from 2013, and an 8 percentage point increase since 1992).

  • tom2

    Another glaring example of America’s desperate need for school choice. I’m not talking about teachers’ idea of choice and certainly not the union’s idea. Milton Friedman called it “the tyranny of the status quo” and it’s the current barrier to real school choice. In other words, we’ve become convinced that government schooling is just too big and entangled to change. Most know what’s needed is a robust free market filled with all kinds of accredited schools, able to deliver general subjects as well as all kinds of specialties, including athletics and the arts. Everyone knows intuitively that school taxes should be returned to parents in the form a voucher, spendable in any accredited school by parents according to their choice.

    Every student would receive a voucher worth the same amount regardless of school taxes paid. Such a system would remove the tyranny, drugs, crime, bullying and bias because no business would survive if it tolerated such behavior. It would concentrate the drug users & pushers, illegal aliens and other scofflaws into public schools that wouldn’t need to compete. Such a system would neuter America’s largest union whose primary function is to take money from school employees and give it to democrat candidates. And employees of these schools wouldn’t besmirch those who pay the bills.

    Most importantly, a free enterprise system eliminates indoctrination of students to unwelcome political agendas. But if you don’t like this alternative, you’re stuck with the costly current mandatory one-size-fits-all system. Currently, it feeds the masses at food courts that would make any commercial mall proud — with really bad food that the kids hate. It transports everyone to everywhere — on 300,000 buses – costing about $30 billion. It funds exotic musical instruments used only by a handful of kids who often already have plenty of private money. It provides expert and very expensive facilities and training for the professional sports industry that later employs only an infinitesimally small percentage of students who aren’t required to graduate.

    Expelled students currently have nothing to lose because the cost is assessed whether they graduate or ever return. The primary problem with our current system is it faces no competition. It’s a monopoly in a nation where monopoly is considered a criminal enterprise for everyone else. In America, students are forced to attend at the point of a gun but are not protected with like force. And parents are forced to pay or lose their homes. Additionally individuals and businesses are required by the state to pay forever, long after their kids are grown and even if they had no children. Proposed is an escape from the propaganda mills we call public schools and the extracurricular funding that everyone knows is brazen communism. Failure to escape quite simply is due to “tyranny of the status quo” or simple resistance to change.

  • teaman

    Do you suppose some of this failure had to do with ILLEGALS infiltrating our school system?

    • Centurion

      Possibly, but let’s not forget the damage caused by Common Core.

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